Ani Molnár Gallery, Budapest: ‘of places no longer being separated’

The Ani Molnár Gallery is pleased to present a solo show entitled ‘of places no longer being separated’ by Dénes Farkas.

Opened by: Krisztina SZIPŐCS, art historian

The exhibition is on view: until 12 February, 2015

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Farkas’s installation built up of text fragments and photos raises questions about reality, existence and human relationships. His works depicting black-and-white fictitious spaces or abstract-like representations of everyday life enivroment are to provoke understanding of human existence and their role within their surroundings in a way that motivates viewers to create their own narrative.

Exploring the intertwined net of text fragments and photos and their connotations, one is facing more and more questions without finding any answer as proceeding in the exhibition space. There is a large-scale photo as well as a complimentary installation built around a lamp, which act as clues for the understanding of the show, however they do not lead to any solution. The recurring gap in the connections between the exhibited objects gradually reveals fundamental philosophical questions concerning absence, realities, non-existence and presence.

Dénes Farkas (1974) was born in Budapest, now lives and works in Tallinn. He studied at the Estonian Academy of Arts and completed his MA as a photographer in 2003. Dénes Farkas has had numerous solo and group exhibitions for example in Kumu, Tallinn or in the Contemporary Art Centre of Vilnius. In 2010 and 2014 he received one of the most prestigious awards in Estonia, the annual prize of the Estonian Cultural Foundation. In 2013 he represented Estonia at the Venice Biennale with a solo show curated by Adam Budak and in 2015 he participated in the Turku Biennale. His works have been on show at prestigious international art fairs such as The Armory Show, New York; ARCOmadrid; Art Brussels; Artissima, Turin and Viennafair.The Ani Molnár Gallery is pleased to present a solo show entitled ‘of places no longer being separated’ by Dénes Farkas.

Opened by: Krisztina SZIPŐCS, art historian

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